Step 1

What do you want your brand to become?

Some brand owners believe they need to develop a highly differentiated positioning while others (often referred to as ‘Byron Sharpies’ these days), focus on making their brand highly distinctive and memorable.

Either way, it’s important to have a clear idea of what associations, emotions and key moments you want to connect with your brand in people's minds. We’ve seen teams using ‘keys,’ ‘onions’ and even ‘Piñatas’ to help them define their brand. These checklist-style frameworks typically address the following questions:

  • Who will buy our brand?
  • Which emotional needs is it fulfilling?
  • Which functional needs feed into this?
  • Which characteristics help people believe our brand meets these needs?
  • Which adjectives describe the desired personality of our brand?
  • What are our existing and future ‘distinctive brand assets’?*
  • Which human insight** will inspire our communications?

*eg logos, words, phrases, slogans, shapes, colors, sounds/music, rituals, mascots

**an idea that resonates with with the target audience and is related to what we want people to feel about our brand (read more on this later)

A brand doesn’t need definitive answers to every question to develop great advertising, but having a decent idea of what the brand stands for does seem to make it easier. Take Snickers, for example — a brand whose success is frequently attributed to having a clear brand vision with advertising to match.

  • Who will buy our brand?

Teenagers and young adults

  • Which emotional needs is it fulfilling?

To be ourselves at our best

  • Which functional needs feed into this?

To fill us up when we’re hungry

  • Which characteristics help people believe our brand meets these needs?

Snickers bars contain peanuts which are filling and nutritious and sugar which provides energy

  • Which adjectives describe the desired personality of our brand?

Energetic, direct, humorous

  • What are our existing/future ‘distinctive brand assets’?

The phrase ‘You’re not you when you’re hungry,’ the logo/pack/red parallelogram, the ‘rip and chew’ product shot

  • Which consumer insight will inspire our communications?

People’s temperament changes when they’re hungry; they’re not themselves again until they’ve had something to fill them up

Learn how Zappi can help you with ad development